"Fizzy Skincare" Is Now A Thing

Japan's skincare

Hair & Beauty
 

The skincare industry is awash with various 'buzz words' and phrases - from multi-masking to micellar, AHAs and retinol - and now it’s carbonated cleansers. When you think of the word carbonated, fizzy drinks might spring to mind. But now it's being hailed at the solution to dull, congested skin. It sounds strange on first glance, but stick with us - there's method in the madness...

 

Beauty insiders in Asia (where else?) have been using carbonated (“fizzy”) skincare for years - with products like Elizavecca Carbonated Bubble Clay Mask doing the rounds on Instagram and wowing their Insta followers with their surreal-looking snaps of ‘bubble masks’ in action. But it’s taken a while to catch on over here, with brands like Bioré and Nude now offering up their own carbonated cleansers and masks.

 

So how do they work? Well, ingredients like sodium bicarbonate (aka baking soda) are a powerful exfoliant, containing enzymes to remove excess make-up, grime and gunk. There are several recipes online for ‘home remedies’ using baking soda from your cupboard, but this can be quite drying so we wouldn’t recommend! The foaming effect means it’s a lot lighter and less harsh than an acid toner or face scrub, making it ideal for more sensitive skin types.

 

Want to give ‘fizzy skincare’ a go? Try Bioré’s Baking Soda Cleansing Scrub (£5.29 Superdrug) which is great for sorting out oily/combination skin. But if you want to go authentic, Japanese brand DHC’s Foaming Face Wash Powder (£10.50 BeautyMART) is another good bet for skin that’s congested and spot-prone, effectively sloughing away dead skin cells so that other products can absorb better. 

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